Sunday, December 29, 2019

"The Cantankerous Man": A Christmas Story by Alexandros Moraitidis


The Cantankerous Man

By Alexandros Moraitidis

(1889)

On Christmas Eve Old-Spyraina had excited common curiosity. Indeed, according to the most precise observations of the old gammers – who are the most observant of all living beings everywhere – she had appeared twelve times from dawn till the forenoon upon the Cliff, the highest point in the insular town, from which one could gaze at the expanse of the sea.

“What’s come over that woman there?” The old women repeatedly wondered seeing Old-Spyraina panting up and down the Cliff – she lived at the Threshing Floors, at the extremity of the town.

Saturday, December 28, 2019

"The Slacker's Christmas" (Alexandros Papadiamantis)


The Slacker's Christmas

By Alexandros Papadiamantis

The gelid northerly wind was blowing and high up in the mountains was snowing. One morning, master-Pavlos Piskoletos entered Patsopoulos’ public house to steady himself with an invigorating cup of rum, as he was ousted from home by his wife, reviled by his mother-in-law, beaten by his brother-in-law, exorcised by Madam Stratina, his landlady and shown the open palm by his three-year-old son, diligently coached by his worthy uncle to do this reviling gesture, the way parents do among the scum of society – how to revile, swear, blaspheme, and generally be utterly irreverent to holy symbols, such as the holy Cross, icons, candles, censers and kollyva. Tales appropriate for the Athenian public!

Thursday, December 26, 2019

"The Christmas Bread" (Alexandros Papadiamantis)


The Christmas Bread

By Alexandros Papadiamantis

(Published in 1887)

Among the many popular characters, who will always be the center of interest in the tales of the future story teller, paramount positions are held by the bad mother-in-law as well as the wicked step mother. Concerning the wicked step mother, I shall try to describe one some other time for the instruction of my readers. This tale is about the wicked mother-in-law.

Friday, December 20, 2019

The Reception of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" in Greece


By John Sanidopoulos

By the time A Christmas Carol was first translated into Greek in 1888, Charles Dickens was already known in Greece. Despite the high rate of illiteracy in the newly-formed Greek state (87.5% of men in 1840; 93.7% of women in 1870), Dickens began to be known in 1851. His works were published through the four main Greek literary journals by the intelligentsia of the time who wished to publish works that portrayed all social classes to diffuse knowledge and bring about social progress.